LUC Briefing 008: Music

“A film is – or should be – more like music than fiction”
-Stanley Kubrick

The next LUC Briefing will be on the subject of: Animals

 

i. The Long Goodbye

In a move that is either an inspired piece of cinematic brilliance, or time-saving laziness, the score for Robert Altman’s 1973 film of The Long Goodbye consists of just one song, played in many different styles throughout the film. John Williams arranged all manner of variations, from jazzy efforts, to crazy mariachi music, although as it was the early 70’s there is no dubstep remix. You can get the idea from this montage

ii. Rappin’ For Jesus

Considering all the wild, wonderful and dubious things that LUC has ever shown, it says something that nothing has ever elicited a reaction nearly as shocking as this music video produced by a church outreach programme. There is no way of understanding the thought processes behind this – just make sure that you are not eating or drinking around the 35 second mark. Trigger Warning: Potentially lethal levels of awkwardness.

iii. Jazz As Visual Language

jvl.jpgLeamington Spa’s very own Nicolas Pillai has just launched a book about Jazz as seen through the filter of cinema and TV. You can get it straight to your Kindle from Amazon right now, or for more info check out this interview with London Jazz News…

“Simply put, this is a book about how jazz has been mediated through film and television. We often ask ourselves, what is jazz? This is a question reflected by these film and television representations. Through image composition and editing, they present that question in visual terms: what is jazz? How has its meaning changed over the decades? What is its significance to the people who play it, who finance it, who listen to it or dance to it?”

LINK: http://www.londonjazznews.com/2016/11/interview-nicolas-pillai-new-book-jazz.html

iv. Just by Radiohead is probably the best music video ever

I know OK GO have made all those incredibly clever and entertaining videos and that R Kelly produced the demented disasterpiece that is Trapped In the Closet, but for LUC’s money the apex of the short form musical video is Jamie Thrave’s film for Radiohead’s 1995 release ‘Just’. Watch and enjoy.

v. Drinkenstein

Did you know that Sylvester Stallone and Dolly Parton once made a country and western musical together? If not it may be because the UN convention on human rights was used to cover it up.

The film in question, Rhinestone, features Parton teaching Stallone to be a country singing sensation as part of a bet with her sleazy manager over whether she will sleep with him. Yes, I know, the drugs in the 80’s must have been amazing. You may study this clip and assume that Stallone was labouring under some kind of contractual obligation, apparently not as he is credited as co-writing the script.

vi. The Time That Steven Seagal Played The Blues At Warwick University

There is not much to add to this, except that his band is called ‘Thunderbox’

vii. The Importance Of Music in Cinema

There is probably no better illustration of the effect of music on the experience of cinema than watching the lat few minutes of Star Wars without the stirring orchestral send off.

viii. Searching For The Brown Note

From an article on vice.com:

“There are dozens of YouTube videos claiming to be the real brown note, mostly with comments saying they don’t work – but occasionally the odd positive response turns up among the “South Park brought me here” messages. Commenters in these instances claim the noise cured their constipation, or that the brown note caught them by surprise and really worked, but were these historically trustful anonymous YouTube trolls telling the truth?”

in-search-of-the-brown-noise-1479926116.jpeg

Article: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/in-search-of-the-brown-noise

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Festival kicks off Saturday with Zero Effect, Unlock Sherlock & Desert Island Films

LUC commences our biggest festival so far with two great events on Saturday 7th November at North Hall.

At 4.30 the festival kicks off with a screening of the brilliant, cult detective movie Zero Effect starring Bill Pullman and Ben Stiller. The film will be preceded by Unlock Sherlock, an exploration of the history of Sherlock Holmes on film with our panel led by Nic Pillai and featuring Mike McCahill.

Tickets are a bargain £5 either on the door or in advance from wegottickets.com

Desert island films POSTER 1000PXLater at 8pm we have an exciting new event, Desert Island Films. Our panel of critics, bloggers and academics will discuss and defend their choice of essential viewing. Films as diverse as Magnolia, Dracula 200 and Showgirls will all be getting the treatment in what promises to be an informative and entertaining evening.

Tickets for Desert Island Films are also a suspiciously reasonable five quid and will be available on the door, or to be sure of your seat grab them in advance from wegottickets.

North Hall is located in Spencer Yard, we will have LUC staff lurking around the place to point you in the right direction, but here is a quick map to help you find your way (or open on Google maps).

north hall map

LUC Festival opens with ZERO EFFECT & ‘Unlock Sherlock’

The third Leamington Underground Cinema Festival opens on Saturday 7th November with a screening of cult detective mystery Zero Effect. Bill tumblr_mq08is5IT61qd3nk9o1_1280Pullman stars as the enigmatic and brilliant Darryl Zero, the world’s greatest and most secretive detective, who is investigating a particularly complicated case of blackmail and murder.

Before the the film we have a special treat in the form of ‘Unlock Sherlock’ a talk and panel discussion of the history of the great detective in film. Speakers will include Nic Pillai and Mike McCahill amongst others.

The programme will also include some short films selected in competition for the LUC Short Film Prize 2015.

This event is taking place at North Hall, Spencer Yard and tickets are just £5. Doors will open at 4pm and activities will commence at 4.30 pm.